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Reactive Extensions (Rx): Helpful Info Sources

June 15, 2013

In the spring of 2010 I ran across the new Reactive Extensions (Rx) and was impressed with their potential.  But I did not have the time to do much more than read about their capabilities.  I pushed the task of learning more on my stack.

A couple of weeks ago I had reason to pop Rx off of my “to learn” stack and spent some quality time looking through the body of introductory literature that is now quite large and useful.  I’ll share the links I found most helpful shortly.  You GOTTA check out Rx!

If you are on the receiving end of a stream of data or events, then the Reactive Extensions can likely save you literally hours of coding!  No kidding.  In 10 to 15 lines of Rx code you can produce functionality to process a stream of data or events that could take hours to write the code for in regular old C#.   Rx uses LINQ to make this possible.

Do you want to process a stream of MouseMove events in the UI?  Need to process and buffer data feeds asynchronously?  Are you on the receiving end of data coming in from WebSockets that needs to be aggregated, grouped, or sorted?  Then you GOTTA check out Rx!  Read the below links.

The MVP Mark Michaelis and Alan Greaves have recently written an extremely good article that clearly demonstrates the power of Rx, and their ease of use:

http://visualstudiomagazine.com/articles/2013/04/10/essential-reactive-extensions.aspx

There is a really nice looking eBook introducing Rx, and teaching you how to use these Reactive Extensions by Lee Campbell.  It is free online, as a web site at http://www.introtorx.com/  or you can download it to your Kindle from that site. Be sure to read Part 1 — Getting Started:  Why Rx?  It says when to use Rx, and when not to.

Finally, Microsoft has a wealth of learning materials, samples, videos, etc at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/gg577609

Hope this helps,

George Stevens

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dotnetsilverlightprism blog by George Stevens is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Based on a work at dotnetsilverlightprism.wordpress.com.

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